Headaches: Common vs. Normal

by | Feb 18, 2021 | Upper Cervical

Though it may be common for you to have headaches, it is by no means normal! In fact, I hear it all the time, “Dr. Bill, I have normal headaches.” What is a normal headache? Does a “normal” headache even exist? There is a major difference between common and normal, let’s explore!

The International Headache Society lists 129 different types of headaches, the general categories are tension, cluster, and migraine with associate pain being described as sharp, stabbing, dull, throbbing, vice-like, and migraine with or without aura. According to the Migraine Research Foundation, 4 million people suffer from chronic migraine headaches defined as having at least 15 migraines a month and 90% are unable to work or function during that time.

Though It is very “common” for an individual who is suffering from chronic migraine headaches to experience one, we would be hard-pressed to say that their experience is normal. Many migraine and headache sufferers experience them so often that they become commonplace and become part of their everyday life.

Yes it’s true, everyone may experience a headache from time to time due to stress, short-term illness, seasonal change, or dehydration, but when headaches become a staple in one’s life it’s important to know that it is definitely not normal. Symptoms are an important way to get our attention and remind us that something isn’t quite right, a headache can be just that. Headaches can mean a variety of different ailments but they should not be ignored.

Common treatments and medical interventions are typically through pharmaceutical drugs. Pain kills, Tylenol, and other over the counter drugs such as aspirin are commonly used. Taking painkillers on a regular basis can make subsequent headaches even worse, causing a condition known as “rebound headache” or “medical overuse headache.”

Although headaches are not caused by just one specific source, a large amount of research clearly demonstrates that the majority of headaches are caused by problems in the cervical (neck) region of the spine. The vertebrae of the cervical spine can become misaligned because of excessive or repetitive stress. Subluxations, or misalignments of the cervical vertebrae can cause a variety of headaches. Research points to over 70% of all headaches arising from problems with the cervical spine.

Personally, I have worked with hundreds, if not thousands of individuals over the years suffering from chronic headaches and have seen many people transition from commonly having them to normally not!

Curious to have a conversation about how your headaches are stopping you? You can make a consultation by going here!